Monday, February 13, 2012

I love words

Etymology is the study of the history and origin of words. 
Entomology is the study of bugs. 
Therefore, etyentomology is the study of words about bugs. 
I love words. 
(I don't love bugs. I don't hate them, but if I was on first name terms with one he probably wouldn't be on my Christmas card list...You know, unless he sent one first, and I was guilted into reciprocating.) 
Anyway, I love words.

I love this: 




And I love this: 



And even though it's Monday, I kind of love today as well. 

***
What is making you happy today? 

14 comments:

  1. I love words too. If I can find some time today to put some new ones in my novel I will be happy.

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    Replies
    1. That would certainly make it a good day!

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  2. I love words too...
    I'm very happy at the moment, because today is the Origins Blogfest and during my blog-hopping, I realised that quite a few prolific writers don't have the earth-shattering writing origins that I expected to read about...
    Happy Monday!

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    Replies
    1. I love the idea of having an origin story!

      "I was handed the sacred muse stone by the last priestess of Concordia as she lay on her deathbed..."

      I blame my storytelling on the fact that my parents didn't have a TV for several years when I was a kid.

      Happy Monday!

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  3. That crows pun is one of my favourites. I love the QI clip, can't believe I haven't seen it before.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sarah! I spend way too much time watching QI clips on Youtube. Just one more, just one more, I'll go to bed after just one more. Wait, why it is daylight?

      Delete
  4. Who is Ronni Ancona and will she come over for dinner?

    Love the crows, too, and yeah, I'm one of those who'll look up the roots of words just 'cause I love all that flowing Latin and rugged Germanic.

    Like I just got curious and discovered origin is from Middle English origine, from the Latin oriri, to rise, which goes back to 14th century orient, which comes from the Greek ornynai, to rouse, and oros, mountain.

    So it probably all goes back to some ancient Greek crawling from his cave, seeing the sun rousing itself from the mountains in the east (the Orient), and going, "Ooh... eeee..."

    And inspiring a blogfest 10,000 years later.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you liked the clip, MC!

      I am a sucker for language. There has to be a reason I took Old and Middle English at uni, and it sure as hell wasn't for the number of conversations with men called Herweroerd that I've missed out on.

      Delete
  5. Currently, what's making me happy is that "attempted murder" picture. I love a good pun. And also studying word origins and blabbing on about them on my blog. Isn't Old and Middle English cool?

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    Replies
    1. I love Old and Middle English! Makes Shakespeare look like Dr Seuss, doesn't it?
      :)

      Delete
  6. Word puns (like the crow bar picture) and other language based jokes are a soft spot for me. There's a great one that says The Capital of England is E.

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    Replies
    1. Steph, that's awesome! It suddenly makes geography a lot easier!

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  7. Nice blog. As a lover of words you might be interested in the word play involved in cryptic crosswords. I am doing a series of posts on solving cryptic clues. This was the first one I did. http://caroleschatter.blogspot.co.nz/2012/01/cryptic-crosswords-solving-hints-1.html Hope you enjoy.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Carole, I will check it out. Cryptic crosswords take me absolutely ages. My mum can figure them out so quickly! I have a love/hate relationship with them. They make me want to tear my hair out, but I am always hugely proud when I finish them.

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